Contents

Volume 76 Number 4 2003
ISSN: 0032-258X  eISSN: 1740-5599

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Commentary      279

Contributory Factors and the Situation of Children during Incidents of Domestic Violence: A Snapshot
Mark Mason     281

ABSTRACT

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PJ 76 (2003) 281

Contributory Factors and the Situation of Children during Incidents of Domestic Violence: A Snapshot

Research suggests that alcohol is an important contributory factor in incidents of domestic violence. Children living in households where incidents of domestic violence take place are at immediate risk of physical and psychological harm. This study aims to discover what factors most frequently contributed to incidents of domestic violence and what proportion of these incidents involved children in some way, and by doing so assesses the size and nature of the problems in this area. This report draws on information about victims and incidents from 2,596 police incident forms between April 1999 and March 2000. Alcohol was judged to have been the major contributory factor leading to incidents of domestic violence, it having been implicated in 30% of all incidents, while children were disproportionately more likely actually to have been 'involved' in an incident when alcohol or illicit drugs were judged to have been a contributory factor compared to others. The report discusses the implications of these findings.

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Police Recruits' Training and the Socialisation Process: From the Network Perspective
Miki Sato     289

ABSTRACT

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PJ 76 (2003) 289

Police Recruits' Training and the Socialisation Process: From the Network Perspective

Police recruits learn police culture through the process of organisational socialisation. However, in New South Wales, since a Royal Commission inquiry into corruption in the police organisation in the mid-1990s, the organisational environment including police culture has become more complex and contingent. Under such a condition, recruits have been facing socialisation problems caused not only by shock at the gap between pre-entry expectation and reality but also by the diversity and shift of police culture. This article explores a recruit-friendly training method employing organisational network theory to improve socialisation problems. Network theory suggests that developing information networks and friendship networks contributes to an increase in organisational commitment, through which police recruits can socialise with the police organisation as a whole more smoothly.

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Police Cynicism: Police Survival Tool?
Joel Caplan     304

ABSTRACT

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PJ 76 (2003) 304

Police Cynicism: Police Survival Tool?

This article broadly defines cynicism as a pessimistic and suspicious outlook on the part of police officers towards their job, the public and society as a whole. Cynicism is an evolving characteristic of even the most idealistic police recruits. Since it appears to be inevitable, should it be considered an unpleasant epidemic and condemned, or should it be respected and embraced as a necessary police survival skill? Through comprehensive research and the author's self-analysis of journal entries made when he worked as a police officer, this article seeks to understand why police become cynical. Then it looks at the effects of cynicism on the police personality and police'community relations. While cynicism has negative side-effects for police personnel, its positive role in police work cannot be overlooked. The public expects a proactive, crime-fighting police force. For this reason, cynicism can be a valuable tool for the police.

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Victim-Centred Policing: The Shepherd's Solution to Policing in the 21st Century
Mark Clark     314

ABSTRACT

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PJ 76 (2003) 314

Victim-Centred Policing: The Shepherd's Solution to Policing in the 21st Century

The article discusses the emergence of victim-centred policing as a philosophical approach to reducing the effects of criminal victimisation. It discusses the convergence of criminological thought with policing in identifying the importance of the victim in the response to crime. It identifies the need to restructure policing practices to position the victim as a strategic focus for policing in the twenty-first century and to take the institutional lead in the criminal justice system. The symbolic, cultural and philosophical transformation necessary to operationalise the philosophy of victim-centred policing is examined. The importance of social research and the need for professional expertise within the policing unit to facilitate victim-centred police operations is also discussed. The article explores the role of the victim in traditional law enforcement and the move towards models of community policing that emphasise victim involvement in the criminal justice system. A discussion of the victimisation process and the inclusion of principles of restorative justice as a critical factor in the recovery of the victim are provided.

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Recent Judicial Decisions
William J. Priestley     328

Book Reviews

Investigating murder: Detective work and the police response to criminal by Martin Innes, Lecturer in Sociology, University of Surrey     353

Preparing for police duty by Fraser Sampson     354

Textbook on criminal law, 7th edition by Michael Allen     357

Abuse of process in criminal proceedings by David Corker and David Young     358

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Links to other issues

Volume 74 (2001) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 75 (2002) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 76 (2003) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 77 (2004) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 78 (2005) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 79 (2006) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 80 (2007) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 81 (2008) :   1   2   3

Volume 82 (2009) :   1   4

Volume 83 (2010) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 84 (2011) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 85 (2012) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 86 (2013) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 87 (2014) :   1

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