Contents

Volume 15 Number 4 2013
ISSN: 1461-3557  eISSN: 1478-1603

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Facilitating child witness interviewers’ understanding of evidential requirements through prosecutor instruction

Kimberlee S. Burrows, Martine B. Powelland Jeromy Anglim
Keywords: child sexual abuse, investigative interviewing, child witness     263
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.316

ABSTRACT

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 263

Kimberlee S. Burrows, Martine B. Powelland Jeromy Anglim

Prosecutors report that the evidential usefulness of child witness statements about abuse is often limited by unnecessary interview content and excessive length. Prior research indicates that this limitation may be attributed to a mismatch between interviewers’ and prosecutors’ understandings of the legal requirements of an interview. The aim of this study is to examine whether differences in the evidential qualities that are perceived as important by prosecutors and interviewers can be reduced through simple instruction. Five prosecutors and 33 interviewers completed a written exercise wherein participants were required to identify what aspects of information required follow-up in five hypothetical narrative accounts of abuse. Twenty of the interviewers had (prior to completing the exercise) received prosecutor instruction on the requirements of interviews in terms of the elements and particulars of sexual offences, and the manner in which necessary information is best elicited in an interview (from a legal perspective). The responses to the exercise of interviewers who had and had not received prosecutor instruction were compared. The results indicated that interviewers who had received instruction were more consistent with prosecutors in their responses to the exercise. The importance of these findings, and directions for future research, are discussed.

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Models for aggression by police officers towards romantic partners and police partners

S. Hakan Can, Helen M. Hendy and Meaghan Imbody
Keywords: police aggression, police supervisors, employee assistance programmes     273
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.317

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 273

S. Hakan Can, Helen M. Hendy and Meaghan Imbody

Past research documents that occupational challenges faced by police officers may increase the risk of aggression toward romantic partners, but little research is available on aggression by police officers in another close relationship, that occurring within the ‘fraternal order’, toward their police partners. The purpose of the present study was to enhance understanding of police aggression in close relationships by comparing ‘models’ of aggression suggested by Social Learning Theory, including powerful others or peers from the ‘home family’ (father, mother, siblings) and from the ‘police family’ (police supervisor, police partner). Participants included 120 police officers (95 per cent male; mean age = 38.9 years; 90 per cent Caucasian) who completed anonymous questionnaires to report aggression in each relationship using the 12-item Revised Conflict Tactics Scale. Multiple regression revealed that the set of ‘home family’ and ‘police family’ models of aggression explained 35.5 per cent of the variance in romantic partner aggression and 59.1 per cent of the variance in police partner aggression reported by officers, with aggression from the father and the police supervisor being the most significant models of aggression. Results suggest that in terms of aggression used as a conflict resolution strategy in close relationships, police officers experience less of a ‘fraternal order’ than a ‘paternal order’, with ‘father-figure’ individuals serving as the most significant models. Employee Assistance Programmes to encourage ‘PEACE IN THE FAMILY’ for police may require participation by police supervisors, who must also work to model non-aggressive means of conflict resolution within their departments.

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Discriminatory use of police stop-and-search powers in London, UK

Shaka Yesufu
Keywords: discrimination, police, prejudice, racism, stop and search     281
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.318

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 281

Shaka Yesufu

Black Londoners have complained over the years of being overpoliced and harassed by police officers. The history of such contentious encounters between members of the Black community and the police service dates back to the 1970s, an era that was characterised by the implementation of the ‘Suspicion Laws’, popularly referred to as the ‘Sus Laws’, which emanated from the legislation of the Vagrancy Act of 1824. It was an era most Black people would prefer not to talk about because of the oppressive encounters they experienced with the police. This paper has three purposes: first, to highlight the history of police abuses of power in relation to dealing with Black Londoners in a discriminatory way; second, to explore the issue of societal racism, facilitated by the trio of concepts of prejudice, stereotyping and racial discrimination; third, to encourage the debate on police accountability by discouraging the discriminatory policing that permeates UK society.

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Police gifts and benefits scandals: addressing deficits in policy, leadership and enforcement

Tim Prenzler, Alan Beckley and Simon Bronitter
Keywords: police ethics, police gratuities, hospitality, gifts and benefits, phone hacking scandal, police corruption     294
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.319

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 294

Tim Prenzler, Alan Beckley and Simon Bronitter

This paper examines three recent high-profile cases involving gifts and benefits to police. The cases, two from Australia and one from England, involved both frontline officers and senior managers. The analyses track the unfolding scandals, and how they were investigated and evaluated by official inquiries. In two of the cases, gifts and hospitality were enmeshed with wider forms of corruption. The official inquiries identified how gratuities undermined public confidence in the impartiality of police, and how inappropriate gifts and benefits were facilitated by liberal policies and deficient leadership. The paper concludes by arguing that police need to adopt a highly restrictive policy on gratuities, and follow through with effective forms of compliance management.

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Police managers’ attitudes towards a US Marine Corps military model: responses to Corps Business

Julie Kunselman, Gennaro F. Vito and William F. Walsh
Keywords: military model, police management, police administration     305
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.320

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 305

Julie Kunselman, Gennaro F. Vito and William F. Walsh

Historically, police departments have been modelled both structurally and operationally on quasimilitary lines. This paper presents reactions of police managers who attended the Administrative Officers Course at the Southern Police Institute at the University of Louisville, who analysed David Freedman’s book, Corps Business. This work presents 30 management principles practised by the US Marine Corps. Students were asked to rate the five best and five worst practices as they applied to police management. Their responses provide a timely analysis of the status of the linkage between police management and the military model.

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Criminal network analysis inside law enforcement agencies: a data-mining system approach under the National Intelligence Model

Patrick Seidler and Rick Adderley
Keywords: criminal network analysis, NIM, CRISP-DM, data mining     323
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.321

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IJPSM 15 (2013) 323

Patrick Seidler and Rick Adderley

All police forces in the UK, and many Forces in Europe and the USA, use the National Intelligence Model as a means to provide relevant, timely and actionable intelligence. Increased awareness of the benefits that criminal network analysis provides in discovering, analysing and visualising networked criminal activity has become an integral part of the intelligence model. Despite numerous research efforts, technology has not achieved the expected improvements in the quality of criminal network analysis intelligence and the time needed to create related intelligence products. As current tools focus on the provision of structural metrics in describing networked crime activity and neglect the integration with Force prioritisation tactics, intelligence outputs from current automated tools rarely produce immediately applicable intelligence products, but leave an operational gap between intelligence analyst and police officers, and numerous manual tasks for the analyst. Using the Cross Industry Standard Process for Data Mining, a database agnostic data-mining methodology, we propose a common standard to provide a structured approach to the manifold of analytical tasks in the process of criminal network analysis and show how those tasks relate to the intelligence model. We aim to depict the specific issues at each stage of the process and show how better results can be achieved through better integration of criminal network analysis and the intelligence cycle.

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INDEX

Indexes      338
DOI: doi: 10.1350/ijps.2013.15.4.322

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Links to other issues

Volume 4 (2002) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 5 (2003) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 6 (2004) :   1   2   3

Volume 7 (2005) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 8 (2006) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 9 (2007) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 10 (2008) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 11 (2009) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 12 (2010) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 13 (2011) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 14 (2012) :   1   2   3   4

Volume 15 (2013) :   1   2   3   4

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